Non-discrimination statement

Mills College does not discriminate on the basis of race, sexual orientation, age, creed, national origin, disability or handicap (in violation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or regulations thereunder) in its admissions policies scholarship and loan programs, or in the educational programs or activities which it operates, nor does Mills discriminate on the basis of sex in its graduate programs. The College enforces against discrimination through its Campus Policy and Procedure on Discrimination which is available on request from the Office of the Dean of Students.

The College is an equal opportunity employer and makes every effort to comply with all applicable state and federal laws and local ordinances prohibiting employment discrimination. All aspects of employment at Mills College are based on merit, qualifications, and competency. Mills College does not discriminate against anyone regarding employment practices, compensation, or promotional or educational opportunities on the basis of race, color, marital status, age, religious creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, disability, physical handicap, mental condition or veteran status. It is the policy of the College to provide reasonable job accommodations to disabled employees who can perform the essential elements of the job for which they are qualified. Inquiries regarding the College's compliance with various laws and regulations should be directed to Michael Rothman, Vice President and Treasurer, Mills College, Oakland, California, 94613, (510) 430-2125.

Queer-friendly Courses at Mills

ENG 061R: Studies in Lesbian Writing (No course description because this course is new Spring 1998)

ARTH 138 Contemporary Art

In the context of the Cold War, the McCarthy period and the explosive Sixties, American art and the American art market were dominant internationally. This situation is now changing in the Eighties with an increasing leadership role being assumed by European artists.The course presents the various art movements such as Happenings, Pop, Minimal, Conceptual and Performance Art, Pattern and Decoration, Earthworks and Site-Specific Art, and the recent Neo-Expressionist concerns. We explore art which responds to the Feminist, Black and Latino movements, and also examine art criticism and art structures of this period. Fall
Offered in alternate years; offered 1998-1999. (Not guaranteed to include queer content.)

ARTH 140 New Directions in Art History and Criticism

This course, supported by the Denise Beirnes Endowment for Studies in Art History and Criticism, explores current issues and new methodological and/or interdisciplinary approaches. Each year a visiting professor will present a different topic. Past topics include African American, Chicano, and Asian American art history. Fall or Spring
No prerequisite.
Staff

ARTH 191A Seminar: Contemporary Women Artists and the Feminist Art Movement

After a brief study of artistic grandmothers, the course traces the growth from the 1960's of feminist activities and concerns in the realm of contemporary art, and the re-establishment of a history of past women artists. From the onset of the contemporary women's movement, California has been a major center and thus, many of the artists, art movements and art institutions examined are Californian. Works studied may include the story-quilts of Faith Ringgold, Judy Baca's Great Wall of Los Angeles, the Dinner Party and Birth Project of Judy Chicago, May Stevens' painted narratives of her mother and Rosa Luxemburg, the femmage work of Miriam Schapiro, the autobiographical and ecological performances of Rachel Rosenthal, the huge pageants of Suzanne Lacy, an d the wide-ranging writings of Lucy Lippard.
Spring
Limited to 15 students.
Offered in alternate years; offered 2000-2001.
Moira Roth

ARTH 192A Seminar: Women in European Art and Society, 1400-1700

This seminar studies women, intellectual notions about women and representations of women in art. It examines selected writings by Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, and Baldassare Castiglione; and primary historical documents, educational treatises, and paintings by the women artists Sofonisba Anguissola, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Judith Leyster. The issues addressed include how women and men were perceived differently by the medical profession, by civil and religious law, and by educators and writers on behavior.
Spring
Limited to 15 students.
Offered in alternate years; offered 2000-2001.
JoAnne Bernstein

ARTH 192B Seminar: The Female Nude in the Renaissance

At the beginning of the 16th century representations of the nude began to figure prominently in landscapes and mythological paintings, and for the first time in European art, the female nude became an autonomous subject. The aim of the seminar is to trace the emergence of the female nude and to explore the social context within which it occurred. The course centers on the period between 1490 and 1520 and the work of Leonardo da Vinci, Durer, Giorgione, Raphael, and Michelangelo.
Spring
Limited to 15 students.
Offered in alternate years; offered 1999-2000.
JoAnne Bernstein

ARTH 192C Seminar: History of Performance Art

Performance art developed in the Sixties, a highly theatrical as well as political decade, in the context of the Conceptual and Earthwork art movements and a deep questioning of art institutions and the role of the artist. This course examines both work by contemporary Performance artists and earlier Performance history. We study the medium's antecedents in the personality and theatrical experiments of the Dada, Surrealist, Futurist and Russian revolutionary art movements. Performance art history is also placed in a wider context of experimental theater, dance and music, and the Dandy tradition.
Fall
Limited to 15 students.
Offered in alternate years; offered 1997-1998.
Moira Roth

DRCM 10/110 Selected Subjects in the Development of Theater

Major developments in the history of theater divided by specific interest areas. Each unit may include attendance at plays performed in the San Francisco Bay Area, and will use the plays to demonstrate the material covered in class lectures.
Meets the Fine Arts Distribution Requirement.

DRCM 10C/110C Theater of Social Comment

Tracing the theater of "Social Comment" from Brecht to the American Theater of the Depression to the street theater of the '60s and '70s.
Fall
Offered in alternate years; offered 1997-1998.
James Wright
Meets the Fine Arts Distribution Requirement. (Currently known to have queer content. Lots.)

DRCM 10E/110E Women in Theater
An examination of the role of women in theater as actors, playwrights, producers, designers, and critics and effect their presence has had on modern theater practice.
Spring
Offered in alternate years; offered 1997-1998.
Deborah Sussel
Meets the Fine Arts Distribution Requirement. (May have queer content.)

DRCM 10F/110F Diverse Voices of Theatre in the U.S.
An examination of the contributions and status of non-European cultures in the theatre in the U.S. Includes presentation by guest artists currently working in theater.
Spring
Offered in alternate years; offered 1997-1998.
James Wright
Meets the Cross/Multicultural Requirement.
Meets the Fine Arts Distribution Requirement. (May have queer content.)

ETHS 49 Womanist Literature and Literary Criticism
This course introduces Womanist Theory. A multi-ethnic, comparative course, designed to provide an opportunity for students to focus study on the literature and literary criticism of women of color; and apply it to selected readings.
Fall
Staff
Meets the Humanities and Writing Requirements. (Should have queer content.)

ETHS 51 Ethnic Heritage in America
An introduction to the theories, concepts, and history of the development of Ethnic Studies. The experiences of African Americans, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, Cuban Americans, Chicanos and Latinos, Native Hawaiians, and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. are examined using a comparative approach from the perspectives of history, sociology, philosophy, literature, and film, and a theoretical framework analyzing the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation.
Fall
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Limited to 40 students.
Melinda Micco (Currently known to have queer content.)

ETHS 90 Comparative Ethnic Literature
An introduction to the literature of African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Chicanos and Latinos. The course will also introduce the literary criticism of Americans of color.
Fall
Staff
Meets the Writing Requirement. (Known to have queer content as of Fall 1996.)

ETHS 120 Portrayal of Mixed Race People in Literature
This course will examine the experiences of mixed racial people in literature. Writings by authors of mixed racial heritage, such as Paula Gunn Allen, Cherrie Moraga, and Leslie Marmon Silko, will be studied to illuminate their experiences within the context of their communities of color as well as within the framework of the dominant society. Topics include theories of marginality, postcolonial literature, oral traditions, "passing" as a survival strategy, urban-and reservation-raised American Indians, immigrant versus non-immigrant communities of color, and intersections of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation.
Spring
Prerequisite Ethnic Studies 64 or consent of instructor.
Not open to freshwomen.
Limited to 20 students.
Melinda Micco
Meets the Humanities Requirement. (currently known to have queer content.)

ETHS 162 Black Writers of the African Diaspora
This course focuses on the literature of blacks in the U.S. and internationally. Black writers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries include Terry, Wheatley, Hammon, Equiano, Stewart, Jacobs, Harper, Douglass, Hughes, Baldwin, Achebe, Soyinka, Hansbury, Morrison, Aidoo, Head, Wright, Walker (Margaret and Alice), Ellison, Marshall, Hayden, Dove, Lorde, Ogot, Komunyakaa, and Nwapa.
Offered in alternation.
Staff
Meets the Humanities and Writing Requirements (Includes queer authors.)

ETHS 166 Women of Color in the Political Movements
This course will examine the role of women of color in the political movements of the 1960s, such as the American Indian Movement, the Black Panther Party, the Chicano Movement, and the Third World Liberation Front. An interdisciplinary approach to readings and lecture material will cover gender roles, ethnic identity, sovereignty, historical background of political movements, racial formation, immigration, the Vietnam War, economics, and political structures.
Spring
Offered in alternation; offered 1997-1998.
Melinda Micco (Not guaranteed to have queer content.)

ENG 158 (258) Contemporary Fiction by Women
This course examines short fiction in English written by women in the second half of the 20th century. We consider form, style, and aesthetics, as well as historical context. We also examine literary representations of identity with special attention to t he intersections of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexuality.
Spring
Offered in alternate years; offered in 1998-1999. (Almost guaranteed to have queer content.)

ENG 171 Social Action and the Academic Essay
This course combines expository and creative writing techniques and exercises to analyze the genre of the academic expository essay and its relationship to issues of social/political change outside the university. Readings reflect a broad spectrum of poli tical positions on contemporary social issues in America, including race relations, sexual orientation, education, homelessness, and prison populations. In addition to reading and writing assignments, each student is partnered with an Oakland high school student; partners are required to meet once a week to discuss and work on shared writing exercises.
Fall
Offered in alternation; offered 1997-1998.
Prerequisites English 1; junior or senior standing.
Letter grade only.
Cynthia Scheinberg.
Meets the Writing Requirement. (Known to have queer content.)

ENG 191-192 (291-292) Advanced Seminars
Topics vary from year to year. The following are samples: Shakespeare, Henry James, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Doris Lessing, the Gothic, Characterization in Western Literature, Epistolarity, 19th Century British Women's Poetry, 19th Century American Prose, and Gertrude Stein and Her Descendants.
Fall and Spring
Prerequisite Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Limited to 15 students.
Staff (Known to have queer content some years.)